How trump Might Not Be Guilty

Robert Mueller wrote that he did not pursue trump, in part because he was unable to prove to himself beyond a reasonable doubt that trump displayed criminal intent. In the vast evidence, I see a few instances of a guilty mind at work, instances which argue forcefully that trump is guilty. I simply can’t believe that Mr. Mueller and company would have missed this guilty mind evidence. However, there is often more to intent than this.

I am left to guess that Mr. Mueller’s possibility of a lack of intent involves trump’s psychological state. A lack of either mental or emotional capacity could result in a verdict of diminished or absent responsibility, in other words, ‘not guilty’. Or, as we non-shrinks/non-lawyers say, “Not guilty by reason of insanity.”

To test my guess, I would like to know whether or not the Special Prosecutor’s investigators interviewed a team of psychologists and psychiatrists. I would also like to know what our expert panel of Trail riders think. Guilty or Not ?

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I’m Going to Saginaw

In a landmark decision a three judge panel on the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals, sitting in Cincinnati declared that chalking tires to enforce two hour parking limits is an unconstitutional act violating the 4th Amendment unreasonable Search clause. From WaPo:


The age-old parking enforcement practice of tire-chalking is unconstitutional, a federal appeals court ruled Monday, saying it violated the Fourth Amendment’s bar on unreasonable searches.


The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit, in a first-of-its-kind decision, ruled that marking a car’s tires to gather information is a form of trespass requiring a warrant, similar to police attaching a GPS to a vehicle to track a suspected drug dealer.


Parking attendants across the country have been chalking tires with big white lines for decades in zones without meters to enforce of time limits and issue tickets. It’s a substantial source of revenue for many cities.


The decision, while undoubtedly bringing joy to parking scofflaws everywhere, could cost some cities money, either from lost revenue or having to install meters where none exist.

[…]


The case came from Saginaw, Mich., where lawyer Philip Ellison engaged in a Facebook rant in 2016 after his law partner, sitting in his chalked car, got ticketed while the two talked on the phone.


Ellison said a friend, Alison Taylor, saw the Facebook post and got in touch to complain about her 15th ticket in two years. She, as plaintiff, and he, as lawyer, filed a civil rights suit against Saginaw and a named parking enforcement officer who Ellison claims “issues more than 95 percent of the tickets.”


“We made a federal case out of tire-chalking,” said Ellison, who is seeking refunds for his client and others caught by chalking. He acknowledged some surprise at his victory, as he could find no comparable chalking precedents.

[…]


A lawyer for Saginaw did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Washington Post – April 23, 2019

No, I’m sure he didn’t – so everyone load up the station wagon – we’re going to Saginaw. Who says the law ain’t fun?

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Earth Day 2019

By Joe Guzzardi courtesy of Cagle:

Fifty years ago, in 1969 when astronaut Neil Armstrong became the first person to walk on the moon, the world’s population was 3.6 billion; in 2019, it’s 7.7 billion. A half a century ago, the U.S. population stood at 208 million; today, it’s 329 million and growing at the unsustainable rate of one net person every 17 seconds, a total calculated by the sum of births minus deaths, plus net migration.
April 22, 2019, marks the 49th anniversary and 50th observance of Earth Day intended to raise awareness and appreciation for the earth’s natural environment. A massive oil spill off the Santa Barbara, California, coast that generated a slick large enough to encompass Chicago provided the catalyst for the first-ever Earth Day, celebrated in 1970, and currently recognized in 193 countries.

[continues]

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